Tang Fei in English w/links

Tang Fei (糖匪) is one of the more interesting of the Chinese New Wave SF authors in that her work frequently crosses genres and seems, to this reader at least, to be closer to slipstream fiction than SF.

《黄色故事》”Call Girl” Trans by Ken Liu 2013 @ Apex, The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2014(Rich Horton ed.)
《蒲蒲》”Pepe” Trans by John Chu 2014 @ Clarkesworld, Apex best of the year reprint Vol 4
《宇宙哀歌》”A Universal Elegy” Trans by John Chu 2015 @ Clarkesworld
《碎星星》”Broken Stars” Trans by Ken Liu 2016 @ SQ
《自由之路》”The Path to Freedom“, Trans by Christine Ni 2016 @ paper-republic
《看见鲸鱼座的人》”The Person Who Saw Cetus” 2017 @ Clarkesworld, and the Chinese version

Serious Soviet Stuff

Currently working on a conference paper on ‘Weird fiction’ that I’ll present in March andran across a lot of interesting stuff related to Soviet Union (unrelated to my topic). First was an interesting AV club sketch about the Zone trope in science fiction, from whence I wound up reading an old (2014) Slate article on the real Stalker subculture that has grown up around Chernobyl since the disaster. There’s a lot of hype around the recent HBO series “Chernobyl,” and of course The New Yorker weighs in. Somehow ended up reading a post about an artist who imagines Barbie and Ken as a Soviet couple living in the past…Good old nostalgia is everywhere.

In other national literatures, excited that in a couple of weeks I’ll get to teach this Toh Enjoe story, “Harlequin’s Butterfly.” Currently reading The Woman in the Dunes (1961) by Kobo Abe and it has a similar vibe. Not very familiar with Abe’s work but I ran across the novel on this very good list of 100 Weird and Strange books and it seemed really interesting.

Daijiro Morohoshi – Weird Manga Hero

Daijiro Morohoshi諸星大二郎)is definitely a weird precursor of Junji Ito but, unfortunately, very difficult to find in English (and even in Chinese). His most famous work is the Yokai Hunter (妖怪ハンター) series of the 1970s-80s.

A good overview of his stuff can be found here (Big5), along with a selection of “four favorites” (Big 5). Not altogether unrelated, some good horror manga recommendations from Silberstein here. Ito isn’t the only one who owes a debt to Morohoshi, legendary anime dude Miyazaki’s Princess Mononoke borrows heavily from the sylvan tribes of Mud Men.