sun-death:

“[The map] is itself apart of the rhizome. The map is open and connectable in all of its dimensions; it is detachable, reversible, susceptible to constant modification. It can be torn, reversed, adapted to any kind of mounting, reworked by an individual, group, or social formation. It can be drawn on a wall, conceived of as a work of art, constructed as a political action or as a meditation.”

— Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus

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This is the Ariadne aspect of the erotic consciousness—the thread held at its two ends by consciousnesses that look for each other, escape each other, capture each other, and rescue each other; and now they are again separated from each other by that thread which, indissociably, links them together. All these Ariadne objects play with the stratagems of truth at the threshold of light and illusion…Escape is inconceivable; the only way out is in the direction of that dark point which indicates the center, the infernal fire, the law of the figure. No longer threads that one ties and unties but corridors in which one is swallowed up, they are ‘configuration objects’, of the type underground, cage and machine—the labyrinth’s inward path. There, error and truth are no longer in question: one may miss Ariadne, one cannot miss the Minotaur.

Aesthetics, Method, and Epistemology, Michel Foucault
(via epekeina)

Jean Baudrillard: Hyperreality and Implosion

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Jean Baudrillard: Hyperreality and Implosion

Hayden WHITE “Postmodernism and Historiography”

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Hayden WHITE “Postmodernism and Historiography”

Project MUSE – Configurations-Volume 25, Number 1, Winter 2017

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Project MUSE – Configurations-Volume 25, Number 1, Winter 2017

Slavoj Zizek – A Pervert’s Guide to Family

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Slavoj Zizek – A Pervert’s Guide to Family

Call for Publications: Verge 6.2 (Infrastructure)

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Call for Publications: Verge 6.2 (Infrastructure)

Dark Media

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Dark Media

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The long poem of walking manipulates spatial organizations. No matter how panoptic they may be: it is neither foreign to them (it can take place only within them) nor in conformity with them (it does not receive its identity from them). It creates shadows and ambiguities within them it insets its multitudinous references and citations into them (social models, cultural mores, personal factors). Within them it is itself the effect of successive encounters and occasions that constantly alter it and make it the other’s blazon: in other words, it is like a peddler, carrying something surprising, transverse or attractive compared with the usual choice. These diverse aspects provide the basis of a rhetoric.

Michel de Certeau