“The Young Companion” and modern China

First published the same year Hugo Gernsback came out with his legendary science fiction magazine, Amazing Stories, in 1926, The Young Companion《良友》catered to the tastes of young middle class people, but it was also a force for social change. This fascinating article (in Big5) talks about 《良友》the “natural breast movement” 「天乳運動」 among young women in the 1920s-30s, and this sohu article (GB) discusses the fashion sense displayed in the pages of the magazine. In this pic you can see that the bobbed, flapper hairstyle we associate with the West was popular in China of the 20s also. The Young Companion is often thought of as product of Shanghai’s hybrid culture, but this article talks about its founding by a Guangdong native, Wu Lian-de (伍聯德).

 

 

 

MSIA 3 Retrospective Modernism

Retrospective Modernism​

The Third Annual International Conference of the Modernist Studies in Asia Network (MSIA)

14-16 May 2020 | Fudan University, Shanghai

Keynote Speakers: Rebecca Walkowitz (Rutgers) | Simon During (Melbourne) | Matthew Hart (Columbia)

Modernism is often characterized by an acute sense of a break between the past and the present. “We are sharply cut off from our predecessors. A shift in the scale,” remarked Virginia Woolf, “has shaken the fabric from top to bottom, alienated us from the past and made us perhaps too vividly conscious of the present.” The aesthetic and political projects of modernism, however, remain inextricable from engagement with literary and intellectual traditions in various parts of the world. Ezra Pound’s phrase “make it new,” one of the most famous slogans associated with modernism, derives from renderings of Confucian thought and teachings. James Joyce’s reinvention of the Odyssey in Ulysses embodies much more than parodies and ironic gestures. And while T. S. Eliot advocated “the historical sense” that “involves a perception, not only of the pastness of the past, but of its presence,” many modernist writers in non-Western contexts such as Lu Xun, Premchand, and Yasunari Kawabata, to name just a few, have depicted with poignancy the clutches or ongoing ravages of the past.

​Perspectives on modernism entail a retrospective effort of the imagination, even as they are inevitably informed by issues and concerns that are contemporary to ourselves. The continued growth of scale – spatiotemporally, archivally, and textually – in modernist studies at once paves the way and makes demands for understanding the complexities of cultural and intellectual history across geographical boundaries. It also calls for a renewal of attention to approaches to traditions and aesthetic practices that vitally strengthen or disrupt connections between the past, the present, and the future.

This conference invites papers that explore retrospective modernism from diverse angles and contexts. In what ways is modernism related to or disconnected from specific intellectual and living traditions? How do modernism’s revolt against and reconfiguration or revaluation of the legacy of the past bear upon its transcultural reception, adaptation, and evaluation? How do modernist scholars around the world today tackle modernism’s retrospective moments, themes, and practices? And how might a retrospective emphasis contribute to or complicate the development of global modernist studies? We welcome papers that focus on textual analysis, cultural studies, historiographical discussions, theoretical and methodological reflections, as well as interdisciplinary work on art, cinema, theater, and other cultural products. 

Please send abstracts of approximately 250 words, together with short bios, to [email protected] by 15 December 2019. Participants will be notified in January, 2020. Further information: https://modernismasia.wixsite.com/main/conference

CFPs | Retrospective Modernism

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CFPs | Retrospective Modernism

Norris, Margot: pg 485

“Hearing poorly, [Hugh] Kenner heard acutely in a variety of registers simultaneously. He heard unspoken sounds that had no substance, that were there but not there, and he heard sounds as material and solid as a hard substance. To convey what he heard, Kenner composed his own poetic language, a singular style of critical writing that lodges with particular grace in our ears. He figures the “little cloud of idioms” surrounding a narrator’s words in free indirect discourse as specks of tiny insects—seemingly insignificant and yet as insistent as gnats: “A word he need not even utter is there like a gnat in the air beside him, for us to perceive in the same field of attention in which we note how ‘scrupulously’ he brushes his hat” (JV, 17).
— “Reading Modernism, After Hugh Kenner (1923–2003) The Voice and the Void: Hugh Kenner’s Joyce,” Modernism/modernity. Vol 12, Number 3, September 2005: 483-486.

Scott Fitzgerald Turns a Corner

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Scott Fitzgerald Turns a Corner

Bloomsburied in China

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Bloomsburied in China